The long-delayed project to remove the temporary security measures around the Federal Courthouse in Carlyle and install new, more permanent security measures will be starting next week. See the video above from the May 2012 meeting of the National Capital Planning Commission (NCPC) where the NCPC gives its approval for the project. Starting at approx. 5:09 in the video, the presenter goes over the plans for the Courthouse.

Some of the improvements include:

  • Removal of jersey barriers around the Courthouse
  • The installation of garden walls and secure bollards around the site.
  • The movement of existing parking spaces from Jamieson Ave to Elizabeth Lane.
  • The reopening of Courthouse Square to one-way traffic.
    • This includes pop-up bollards on Courthouse Square which can be popped up in case of an event at the Courthouse.

Details on the construction from the Carlyle Community Council:

Effective Thursday, March 23rd, Jamieson Avenue will be PARTIALLY CLOSED allowing only one-way traffic heading westbound on Jamieson by the Courthouse construction site.  Traffic from Mill Road headed eastbound for Jamieson Avenue will be diverted.  Eastbound drivers can turn on Elizabeth Lane off of Eisenhower Avenue or continue on Eisenhower Avenue to John Carlyle Street or Holland Lane. Reportedly, this traffic plan will be in effect for the duration of the project, estimated to be completed in the early fall.

The City has directed the general contractor to put a message board at the corner of Mill and Jamieson Ave starting Monday about the one way traffic.

Homayoon Daneshvar, 63, a resident of Washington, D.C., was sentenced Friday to 18 months in prison for charges related to a $1.9 million investment fraud scheme.

Danshevar was also ordered to serve three years of supervised release, forfeit $1.945 million, and pay $926,020 in restitution.

Daneshvar pleaded guilty on Oct. 24, 2016. According to court documents, from in or about April 2009 to January 2013, Daneshvar lied and made false promises to eight victim investors to persuade them to give him approximately $1.9 million. Daneshvar told the victim investors the money would be used for bridge financing to purchase foreclosed property that would be “flipped,” or quickly resold for profit. Daneshvar promised a monthly return on their investments, but in reality Daneshvar used the money to invest in the stock market, pay “returns” on the investments back to the investors, and to pay for his own personal expenses.

Dana J. Boente, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia; and Andrew W. Vale, Assistant Director in Charge of the FBI’s Washington Field Office, made the announcement after sentencing by Senior U.S. District Judge Claude M. Hilton. Assistant U.S. Attorney Grace L. Hill prosecuted the case.

Albert Bryan Courthouse Alexandria, Virginia
We have learned that residents in the Carlyle neighborhood of Alexandria, Virginia can expect INCREASED traffic and possible protests around the Courthouse today (Friday) as there is a case involving the recent Donald Trump executive order being heard at the Courthouse today.

Albert Bryan Courthouse Alexandria, Virginia
Virginia Man Charged with Providing Material Support to ISIL

In a criminal complaint unsealed in the Eastern District of Virginia today, Mohamad Jamal Khweis, 26, from the Alexandria, Virginia area of Fairfax County, was charged with providing and conspiring to provide material support to the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), a designated foreign terrorist organization.

The complaint was announced by Assistant Attorney General for National Security John P. Carlin, U.S. Attorney Dana J. Boente of the Eastern District of Virginia and Assistant Director in Charge Paul M. Abbate of the FBI’s Washington Field Office.

Khweis was detained by Kurdish Peshmerga military forces on March 14, 2016 in northern Iraq after leaving an ISIL-controlled neighborhood in Tal Afar, Iraq. According to the affidavit in support of the criminal complaint, Khweis admitted to renting a car in Alexandria and flying out of Baltimore-Washington International Airport to begin his travel to join ISIL in mid-December 2015. His travel included stops in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands before ultimately crossing into Syria through Turkey with the help of ISIL facilitators. Khweis admitted that he stayed in an ISIL safe house in Raqqa, Syria, with other ISIL recruits who were going through an intake process, and at one point during the intake process, answered yes when asked by ISIL if he would be a suicide bomber. Khweis also admitted to participating in ISIL-directed religious training for nearly one month in preparation for his service to ISIL.

Khweis had his initial appearance at the federal courthouse in Alexandria today at 2:00 PM before U.S. Magistrate Judge John F. Anderson of the Eastern District of Virginia.

This case is being investigated by the FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force. The case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Dennis Fitzpatrick of the Eastern District of Virginia and Trial Attorney Raj Parekh of the National Security Division’s Counterterrorism Section.

You can view the compliant online (PDF)

U.S. Attorney's Office In Carlyle
Dept of Justice SealMyrick Clift Beasley, 56, of Las Vegas, plead guilty Friday to mail fraud charges in connection with a scheme to obtain goods and services on credit using the stolen identities of legitimate, inactive businesses.

In a statement of facts filed with his plea agreement, Beasley admitted that from 2010 through 2015, he assumed the identity of at least 70 legitimate businesses nationwide, and used those stolen identities to obtain, on credit, at least $550,000 in goods and services from various victims.  Beasley admitted that, as part of the scheme, he would identify inactive, legitimate businesses that had previously been located in office buildings where virtual office providers were also located.  Beasley admitted that we would assume the inactive businesses’ identities by renting virtual office space in the buildings in the names of the legitimate businesses, creating internet domain names and email addresses in the identified businesses’ names, obtaining phone numbers previously identified with the businesses when available, and, at times, supplementing state corporate filings and commercial credit records with fraudulent information designed to further the scheme.  Beasley admitted that he concealed his true identity throughout the fraud by using false names and paying for the costs of operating his scheme with prepaid debit cards.  Once he would assume a business’s identity, Beasley admitted that he would then order goods and services — particularly, smart phones, computers, and other electronics — from retailers on credit and have the items shipped to the virtual office location, which would then, at his direction, re-ship the items to rented mailboxes elsewhere in the country.  Beasley admitted he would then retrieve the items from the rented mailboxes and sell them.

Beasley was indicted by a federal grand jury on Dec. 17, 2015.  Beasley faces a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison when sentenced on April 29, 2016.  The maximum statutory sentence is prescribed by Congress and is provided here for informational purposes, as the sentencing of the defendant will be determined by the court based on the advisory Sentencing Guidelines and other statutory factors.

Dana J. Boente, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia; Paul M. Abbate, Assistant Director in Charge of the FBI’s Washington Field Office; and Edwin C. Roessler Jr., Chief of the Fairfax County Police Department, made the announcement after the plea was accepted by U.S. District Judge T.S. Ellis, III.  Special Assistant U.S. Attorney Christopher R. Fenton and Assistant U.S. Attorney Paul J. Nathanson are prosecuting the case.

Albert Bryan Courthouse Alexandria, Virginia

Wayne Shelby Simmons, 62, of Annapolis, Maryland, a former occasional on-air commentator who appeared on a cable news network, was arrested today after being indicted by a federal grand jury on charges of major fraud against the United States, wire fraud, and making false statements to the government.

According to the indictment, Simmons falsely claimed he worked as an “Outside Paramilitary Special Operations Officer” for the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) from 1973 to 2000, and used that false claim in an attempt to obtain government security clearances and work as a defense contractor, including at one point successfully getting deployed overseas as an intelligence advisor to senior military personnel. According to the indictment, Simmons also falsely claimed on national security forms that his prior arrests and criminal convictions were directly related to his supposed intelligence work for the CIA, and that he had previously held a top secret security clearance. The indictment also alleges that Simmons defrauded an individual victim out of approximately $125,000 in connection with a bogus real estate investment.

Simmons will make his initial appearance at 2:00 PM today in front of Magistrate Judge John F. Anderson at the federal courthouse in Alexandria.

If convicted, Simmons faces a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison on the wire fraud counts, 10 years in prison on the major fraud against the U.S. counts, and 5 years in prison on the false statements count. The maximum statutory sentences are prescribed by Congress and are provided here for informational purposes, as the sentencing of the defendant will be determined by the court based on the advisory Sentencing Guidelines and other statutory factors.

Dana J. Boente, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia; and Paul M. Abbate, Assistant Director in Charge of the FBI’s Washington Field Office, made the announcement. Simmons will have his initial appearance later today before U.S. Magistrate Judge John F. Anderson. Assistant U.S. Attorney Paul J. Nathanson is prosecuting the case.

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