Albert Bryan Courthouse Alexandria, Virginia

This back and forth is going to go on for a long time.

Via WaPo

The Washington Redskins filed a motion late Friday defending their lawsuit in federal court against a group of Native Americans over the team’s trademark protections.

The motion argues that the Redskins chose the right courthouse to file their lawsuit and the correct set of plaintiffs to sue in U.S. District Court in Alexandria, Va., possibly the team’s last legal recourse to salvage its federal trademark protections.

The Redskins’ filing is a response to a motion to dismiss the case made last month by the five Native Americans who won a decision by the federal Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, a part of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. The board found in June that the team’s name and logos are disparaging to American Indians and scheduled the Redskins’ trademark protections to be stripped. Since that decision, the Redskins have been able to keep the trademarks while the team makes its appeal.

In an effort to reverse the trademark board’s decision, the Redskins filed a lawsuit against the Native Americans. But last month, the defendants, led by Amanda Blackhorse, a member of the Navajo Nation, argued in their motion to dismiss that the Redskins do not have the legal right to sue them because they are not “parties in interest” who can be targeted in a trademark case based on federal law.

Read more at this link.

Eastern District of Virginia Courthouse in Alexandria

We follow all cases happening at the federal courthouse in Carlyle.

Via WaPo

The Native Americans fighting the Washington Redskins over trademark protections filed a motion in U.S. District Court in Alexandria on Monday, asking the court to toss the team’s lawsuit against them.

The motion argues that team owner Dan Snyder doesn’t have the legal right to sue the five Native Americans who won a key decision by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office earlier this year. The patent office ruled that the name and logo are disparaging and canceled the team’s trademark registration.

The team sued last month, asserting that “Redskins” is not offensive and that the federal agency erred in stripping away six Redskins trademarks.

Snyder has promised never to change the team name, which he contends honors Native Americans. The team has cited polls that have shown that a majority of Native Americans or Americans do not find the team name offensive.

In their motion against the NFL giant, the Native Americans argue that, based on federal law, they are not “parties in interest” who can be sued in a trademark case. The Native Americans — led by Amanda Blackhorse, a social worker and member of the Navajo Nation — have no legal or economic interest in wresting control of the Redskins trademark for themselves as a competing business might.

Read more at this link.

Eastern District of Virginia Courthouse in Alexandria

If you see media trucks around the Carlyle Courthouse today and over the next several weeks, this would be why.

Via WaPo

The Washington Redskins filed a lawsuit Thursday in U.S. District Court in Alexandria, seeking to overturn a U.S. Patent and Trademark Office decision that canceled the team’s trademark registration because it considers the name and logo disparaging.

The Redskins are suing five Native Americans who won the headline-making patent case on June 18, providing them with a largely symbolic victory in their fight to force the team to change its name.

By suing in federal district court, the Redskins are asking for a chance to defend their name, which they contend celebrates Native Americans.

Read more at this link.

(H/T Pat)

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